Extraordinary & Luxurious Packer Park Home For Sale!

3222 S Sydenham St-MLS-17Rarely offered 25 Foot wide, CORNER, Brinton Estates home with 3- CAR Parking, driveway, Custom finishes throughout and huge rear yard, side yard, and 2nd floor deck!!

This Extremely high end home has it all!! The lot size is 28′ x 76′; the home is 25′ wide!!!! Best floor plan and finishes in the area! Several entertaining spaces! Custom Bar, media room and Den on the 1st level with access to a 28″ wide outdoor patio and side yard.

Second floor living space has a wide open living room area drenched in sunlight and an extra-large dining room open to the rest of the floor plan.

3222 S Sydenham St-MLS-9The custom kitchen has 42 inch flat panel modern cabinetry, granite counter-tops, granite back-splash, 48 inch wide commercial grade stainless steel freezer and refrigerator, stainless steel dishwasher, trash compactor, 48 inch wide professional series stainless steel Thermidor gas oven and range with a 48 inch wide professional vent hood system.

15 FOOT LONG GRANITE ISLAND WHICH COMFORTABLY SEATS 12!!!!

3222 S Sydenham St-MLS-11     3222 S Sydenham St-MLS-16

Some other amazing features include: 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, wide plank hardwood floors throughout, Custom wood railings throughout, 3 inch and 4 inch designer recessed lighting throughout, speakers hardwired in almost every room, custom woodwork, crown moldings, beautiful baseboards and solid wood doors throughout.

Top-notch security system with multiple security cameras on the exterior front, rear and side. Several storage closets and storage areas.

Three nicely sized bedrooms each with custom shelving closet systems and tons of natural light. Master bath has marble tile double vanity huge walk-in shower with seamless glass doors and multiple shower heads.

Double glass doors leading to a Double-wide deck perfect for entertaining and dining alfresco. Absolutely amazing set up!

3222 S Sydenham St-MLS-19Truly an exquisite and showcase home located in a tremendous area, walking distance to the Navy Base business center, multi acre green park (FDR Park), Broad street, the sports complex and all of the amazing amenities South Philadelphia and Center City have to offer!!!

3-CAR PARKING!!! One of a kind opportunity!
3222 S Sydenham St, Philadelphia, PA 19145  –  $550,000
Contact Jim Onesti for more info 215.440.2052 or jonesti@mccannteam.com

BHHS Fox & Roach Main Office 215.627.6005

Commercial Rental Available In Packer Park!

photo (11)Wonderful rental opportunity to run your business out of a 1,377 sqft office space finished perfectly with tile floors, sheet rocked walls, a full bath and like-new finishes in every room!

This building is AVA compliant. Rent includes the real estate taxes.

Tenant pays own utilities. The building is 27ft wide, 51ft deep and offers a small outdoor area in the rear, lots of light, tons of storage, high ceilings, reception area in front and more.
This space is broken into several large rooms but the walls can be removed.

Easy access to I76 and I95, located in the Parker Park neighborhood of South Philadelphia down the street from Geary Estate townhomes and Sienna Place townhomes. This building is in perfect condition!

Turnkey opportunity – move right in! Available ASAP!

2237 Hartranft St, Philadelphia, PA 19145 only $2,200/mo!

photo (5)       photo (7)       photo (9)

For more information contact Jim Onesti 215.440.2052 or jonesti@mccannteam.com

Recent Packer Park Sales…

Address Beds Baths Sold Price Settle Date
1908 Geary  4 2.5 $485,000 8/21/2013
1815 Hulseman 3 2 $315,000 6/28/2013
1904 Geary 3 2.5 $482,000 8/28/2013
3170 S 18th 3 1.5 $248,000 5/31/2013
3521 Reserve 3 2.5 $308,000 8/23/2013
1620 Croatan 3 1.5 $335,000 11/8/2013
3010 Smedley 3 1.5 $277,000 5/14/2013
1818 Packer 3 1.5 $245,000 7/25/2013
3230 Chaucer 4 2.5 $350,000 6/11/2013
3514 Reserve 4 2F/2H $367,000 7/26/2013
1526 Curtin 3 1.5 $295,000 7/11/2013
3129 Croatan 3 1.5 $250,000 11/18/2013

For more information on any of these sales or to find out what your home is worth, contact me today! Jim Onesti. 215.440.2052 or jonesti@mccannteam.com

College Grant Available for Packer Park Students!

1Friends and neighbors of Packer Park, Jim Onesti of Prudential Fox & Roach Realtors is so pleased to announce a brand new grant program catered exclusively to families and students in the Packer Park Area.

Jim pledges to donate a portion of his commission from EVERY Packer Park home he sells towards one annual lucky winners college costs!

To be eligible you must be a resident of Packer Park and be accepted and registered to attend college the following fall. To enter please submit your name, address, contact information along with a short essay on who you are and why you think you deserve this grant. All entries must be received in advance, no exceptions.

No one sells more real estate in Packer Park than Jim…so the grant amount has a chance of being very large!!!

To be considered please forward your information to: jonesti@mccannteam.com or mail to:

Jim Onesti. Prudential Fox & Roach Realtors. The McCann Team. 530 Walnut St – Suite 260. Philadelphia PA 19106

Packer Park Court, a 77-unit apartment building, is SOLD!!!!!!!!!!!!! 1859 Hartranft Street

Packer Park Court, a 77-unit garden-style apartment community located on Hartranft Street in Packer Park has SOLD…Yep it’s official…. the asking price was $10,000,000…. the final sale price is not public information yet but our sources tell us it sold for very close to $8,500,000…

Packer Park Court is a rare building in the Packer Park area, which is dominated by single family homes, as we all know…

PPC’s location in this highly-desirable, safe and convenient Packer Park neighborhood of Philadelphia helped it command such a staggering sale price. The neighborhood is a family-oriented and pedestrian-friendly area filled to the brim with high-quality residential development.packer park court

Packer Park Cul-de-sac VS. Packer Park “Main Street” PART 2

1pp  Our February 1st Blog titled, “Packer Park Cul-de-sac VS. Packer Park “Main Street”,   discussed which type of Packer Park Homes sell for more and are more desirable, homes located on a Packer Park Cul-de-sac or main street homes in Packer Park, we wanted to try to dissect the findings of our research a little further…..

As a reminder the results of our data crunching were as follows:

*Since there are many more main street homes than cul-de-sac homes in Packer Park, the number of main street sales was more than double the number of cul-de-sac home sales over the two year period examined in our evaluation.

*SALE PRICE: The average sale price for the cul-de-sac homes was $336,000. The average sale price for the main street homes was $320,000. (close to a 5% difference)

*PRICE PER SQUARE FOOT: The average price per square foot for the cul-de-sac homes was $291 per sq’. The average price per square foot for the main street homes was $277 per sq’.

*DAYS ON MARKET: Average days on market for the cul-de-sac homes was 222. Average days on market for the main street homes was 82. A HUGE difference!!!

But WHY???

We feel the main factor creating these numbers is Supply and Demand. Many of us often disregard how important this simple economic law is. Supply and demand although a simple theory is amazingly important… Supply and demand is the key indicator in todays Real Estate market in my opinion. Center City Philadelphia and the surrounding neighborhoods are experiencing price appreciation and an increased pace of sales because the inventory of homes for sale is almost 20% less than this time last year and is actually at its lowest point since 2006!!!!

Think of it this way…how many buyers are there in our market place right now? Thousands and Thousands…. if there were only two homes for sale in the city, how much would those homes sell for with a thousand buyers fighting over them??? the answer is ALOT!! That is supply and demand…

One of the main factors why Cul-de-sac homes have sold for 5% more than main Street homes and have a price per square foot much higher than the Main street homes is supply and demand… There are always 200-300% more main street homes for sale at any given time then Cul-de-sac homes in Packer Park.

There are other reasons as well but none as Obvious as this.

Currently there are only 9  homes for sale in Packer Park between 250k and 400k..!! If you are looking to sell now may be the time! If you are looking to buy, don’t waste anymore time!!

Who was Packer Park named after? Who was Packer Avenue named after? It was the same Bloke….

Who was our great neighborhood named after??        The answer is William Fisher Packer (April 2, 1807 – Sept 27, 1870) was the 14th Governor of Pennsylvania from 1858 to 1861. His father was James Packer from Chester County, Pennsylvaniaand his mother was Charity Packer. His ancestry was primarily Quakers from Philadelphia. When William was seven years old, his father died, leaving him and his four siblings to help run the house.[1]

WilliamPackerAt the age of 13, he began work as a printer’s apprentice at the Sunbury Public Inquirer and later at the Bellefonte Patriot. He also worked as a journeyman at Simon Cameron’s newspaper the Pennsylvania Intelligencer in Harrisburg.[1]

Packer studied law in Williamsport, Pennsylvania under future member of Congress Joseph Biles Anthony but did not practice, choosing instead to stay in the newspaper business.[1] In 1827, he purchased a controlling share in the Lycoming Gazette which he published until 1836. While working at the Lycoming Gazette, he began an early foray into politics as a major supporter of the construction of the West Branch of the Pennsylvania Canal. The state legislators in Philadelphia had opposed funding the construction and Packer penned an address to Philadelphia to raise public support for the project. The campaign worked and the Philadelphia delegation reversed their position to support the canal.[1]

Packer’s support for the canal did not go unnoticed and in 1832, he was appointed by the Canal Commission to serve as Superintendent of the canals.[1] The position was abolished in 1835 and Packer spent most of that year working for the re-election of Governor George Wolf and running for the Pennsylvania State Senate.[1] A schism in the Democratic Party cost Wolf re-election and Packer a Senate seat.

In 1836, Packer co-founded The Keystone, a Democratic newspaper published in Harrisburg. Packer, through the Keystone, was a supporter of David R. Porter for Governor against Joseph Ritner in the election of 1838. His support of Porter’s successful bid helped him earn an appointment to the Board of Canal Commissioners, a powerful post at the time.[1] After he was re-elected, Porter appointed Packer to the post of Pennsylvania Auditor General in 1842.[1]

After an unsuccessful bid for the Pennsylvania House of Representatives in 1845, Packer won a seat in Pennsylvania House of Representatives in 1847, rising to the post of Speaker of the House. Packer won re-election in 1848 and then successfully ran for the Pennsylvania State Senate in 1849, defeating Andrew Gregg Curtin.[1]

In the State Senate, Packer was an ardent supporter of railroad development in Central Pennsylvania, working towards the establishment of the Susquehanna Railroad.[1] At the time, state policy was to restrain railroad development in southern Pennsylvania which would benefit Baltimore rather than Philadelphia. The act to authorize the railroad connected the York and Cumberland Railroad to cities like Williamsport and Sunbury and increased their access to regional trade. In 1852, Packer became the first President of the Susquehanna, stepping aside after the line was consolidated into the Northern Central Railway.[1]

During the 1856 Presidential Election, friend and fellow Pennsylvanian James Buchanan ran for the Democratic nomination against incumbent Franklin Pierce and Senator Stephen Douglas. Packer worked hard for his nomination and election.[2] Buchanan won the nomination at the 1856 Democratic National Convention in Cincinnati, Ohio and went on to win the Presidency over Republican John C. Frémont and Know Nothing candidate and former President Millard Fillmore.

In 1857, Packer was nominated as the Democratic Party Candidate for Governor. He was opposed by David Wilmot, author of the Wilmot Proviso which aimed to ban the expansion of slavery to territories acquired from Mexico, and Isaac Hazlehurst of the Native American Party.[3] The Panic of 1857 had crippled the nation’s economy, including the Pennsylvania iron industry. With strong support for tariffs in more normal times, the Panic increased Pennsylvania’s support for high tariffs, a stance which hurt the pro-free trade Wilmot.[3] The question of the day, however, remained the issue of slavery in Kansas. Packer forwarded a letter to his friend, President Buchanan, supporting the Kansas-Nebraska Act, but opposing an expansion of slavery in that state without a free and open process.[1] The split of the Republicans and Know Nothings made it difficult to defeat the united Democrats and Packer swept into office.[3]

In dealing with the economic crisis caused by the Panic, Packer vehemently blamed banks and the free issue of paper money over gold and silver coinage.[2] As part of a recovery plan, the Governor approved legislation to requiring state banks to limit the issue of paper currency to amounts covered by real security deposited with the state.[2]

In 1859, Packer sought to end the state’s involvement in construction and management of canals and railroads, selling off the state’s investments to the Sunbury and Erie Railroad.[2]

Governor Packer was a proponent of public schools and supported the new public school system with funds for teacher training. Packer also used his veto power to stop attacks on the new public education system by forces in the legislature.[2]

As his term came to an end, southern states had begun seceding from the union. Packer recommended that the nation’s differences be addressed in a national convention.[2] He opposed secession and, in his final address to the General Assembly, he stated, “It is therefore clear, that there is no Constitutional right of secession. Secession is only another form of nullification. Either, when attempted to be carried out by force, is rebellion, and should be treated as such, by those whose sworn duty it is to maintain the supremacy of the Constitution and laws of the United States.”[1]Packer retired from public life after the end of his term and died September 27, 1870 in Williamsport.