Packer Park Perk #2: Golf, Fishing and Outdoor Activities!!

3One of Packer Park’s highly underrated attractions is its super close proximity to FDR Park in South Philadelphia.

When we sell homes in the area to out-of-town Buyers they are blown away by the underused green oasis within walking distance to our Neighborhood. It is definitely a huge selling point to be able to bike, jog, walk and golf nearby. In addition buyers love that the baseball/softball fields, kids playground, skateboard park, fishing, picnic & tennis areas, dog walking, nature walks and so much more are all within a couple of blocks of Packer Park!

Which other neighborhood in the city can boast that it is located two blocks away from a 348 Acre urban Oasis with a Golf course, about 125 acres of buildings, picnic areas, pathways for walking, landscaped architecture, and a variety of recreation areas placed within about 77 acres of natural lands including ponds and lagoons?

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Bordered by the South Philadelphia Sports Complex on South Broad Street, Interstate highway-95/Philadelphia Naval Yard and Pattison Avenue/ Packer Park residential neighborhood. Many Philadelphians enjoy it as a green “Oasis” for a variety of recreational activities.

2The park was built to the design of Olmsted Brothers, the firm of Frederick Law Olmsted and John Charles Olmsted in the early 1900’s. The parkland was reclaimed mostly from marshlands of Greenwhich Island one of several islands in the area created by river channels present in the 1700 and 1800’s. The use of the park for the Sesquicentennial Exposition in 1926 and subsequent improvements have moderately changed the original design, keeping the main character of the park west of Broad Street. The original plan of the Olmsted Brothers still remains highly visible and significant west of Broad Street. The official name was changed from League Island Park to Franklin Delano Roosevelt Park in the late 1940s and a golf course was constructed. The park’s boathouse, gazebo and American Swedish Historical Museum are reminders of the 1926 Exposition. In 2000, the park was added to the Philadelphia Register of Historic Places.

For more information on buying and selling in Packer Park, contact Jim Onesti today!
jonesti@mccannteam.com or 215.440.2052 Direct

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Did You Know?

Picture1Did you know that the neighborhood around Vet Stadium which encompasses Broad, Juniper & 13th Street just below Packer Ave is not called the Vet Stadium Area?

Did you know that it is not park of Packer Park either?

The neighbors of this great little part of town worked to get full approval and are now known as South Boulevard Community!

PackerParkLiving is so excited for the residents of South Boulevard Community and we are here to help spread the word!!

Do you have some information to share or news to spread? Contact us today!!

Jim Onesti – Prudential Fox & Roach Realtors
215.440.2052 – jonesti@mccannteam.com

Fantastic Packer Park Home For Rent!!

pp1Gorgeous Packer Park Home For Rent!!

This is a 3 bed/2.5 bath home with Garage & Driveway Parking!

This fantastic home, located in The Reserve features a huge kitchen, tile baths, hardwood floors, spacious rear yard and deck! For only $2,500 per month this home comes with all of the bells and whistles that one could hope for!

Available 6/30/13             2754 Square Feet             Lot Size: 35×78

For more information or to schedule a showing contact Jim Onesti 215.440.2052 or jonesti@mccannteam.compp2

Fabulous New Packer Park Listing!

13174 Halsey Pl – 3 bed/2 bath – $369,995

AMAZING Packer Park Beauty on one of the best Cul-De-Sac’s in the neighborhood!
Perfect layout with large dining room, large modern kitchen w/Miele dishwasher,
granite counters and backsplash, Marble tile floors in the living room leading
to a HUGE CedarWood deck and separate brick paved patio with large planting
area! 2nd kitchen with Granite countertops and 2nd entertaining space on
separate level perfect for large crowds or “Man-cave”. Full 2nd bath in lower
level, front brick patio with brick fountain, newer Pella windows, new electric
t/o, entire home speaker/audio system, Granite interior steps- baseboards and
granite dining room table included in sale, all 3 bedrooms have hard woodfloors & are super bright w/
ample closet space, hall bath has marble tile from floor to ceiling and marble floors!!

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This is a very special home on a veryspecial block! Tons of Parking!! Buyer Brokers Welcome!

For more information contact Jim Onesti 215-440-2052 or jonesti@mccannteam.com

Who was Packer Park named after? Who was Packer Avenue named after? It was the same Bloke….

Who was our great neighborhood named after??        The answer is William Fisher Packer (April 2, 1807 – Sept 27, 1870) was the 14th Governor of Pennsylvania from 1858 to 1861. His father was James Packer from Chester County, Pennsylvaniaand his mother was Charity Packer. His ancestry was primarily Quakers from Philadelphia. When William was seven years old, his father died, leaving him and his four siblings to help run the house.[1]

WilliamPackerAt the age of 13, he began work as a printer’s apprentice at the Sunbury Public Inquirer and later at the Bellefonte Patriot. He also worked as a journeyman at Simon Cameron’s newspaper the Pennsylvania Intelligencer in Harrisburg.[1]

Packer studied law in Williamsport, Pennsylvania under future member of Congress Joseph Biles Anthony but did not practice, choosing instead to stay in the newspaper business.[1] In 1827, he purchased a controlling share in the Lycoming Gazette which he published until 1836. While working at the Lycoming Gazette, he began an early foray into politics as a major supporter of the construction of the West Branch of the Pennsylvania Canal. The state legislators in Philadelphia had opposed funding the construction and Packer penned an address to Philadelphia to raise public support for the project. The campaign worked and the Philadelphia delegation reversed their position to support the canal.[1]

Packer’s support for the canal did not go unnoticed and in 1832, he was appointed by the Canal Commission to serve as Superintendent of the canals.[1] The position was abolished in 1835 and Packer spent most of that year working for the re-election of Governor George Wolf and running for the Pennsylvania State Senate.[1] A schism in the Democratic Party cost Wolf re-election and Packer a Senate seat.

In 1836, Packer co-founded The Keystone, a Democratic newspaper published in Harrisburg. Packer, through the Keystone, was a supporter of David R. Porter for Governor against Joseph Ritner in the election of 1838. His support of Porter’s successful bid helped him earn an appointment to the Board of Canal Commissioners, a powerful post at the time.[1] After he was re-elected, Porter appointed Packer to the post of Pennsylvania Auditor General in 1842.[1]

After an unsuccessful bid for the Pennsylvania House of Representatives in 1845, Packer won a seat in Pennsylvania House of Representatives in 1847, rising to the post of Speaker of the House. Packer won re-election in 1848 and then successfully ran for the Pennsylvania State Senate in 1849, defeating Andrew Gregg Curtin.[1]

In the State Senate, Packer was an ardent supporter of railroad development in Central Pennsylvania, working towards the establishment of the Susquehanna Railroad.[1] At the time, state policy was to restrain railroad development in southern Pennsylvania which would benefit Baltimore rather than Philadelphia. The act to authorize the railroad connected the York and Cumberland Railroad to cities like Williamsport and Sunbury and increased their access to regional trade. In 1852, Packer became the first President of the Susquehanna, stepping aside after the line was consolidated into the Northern Central Railway.[1]

During the 1856 Presidential Election, friend and fellow Pennsylvanian James Buchanan ran for the Democratic nomination against incumbent Franklin Pierce and Senator Stephen Douglas. Packer worked hard for his nomination and election.[2] Buchanan won the nomination at the 1856 Democratic National Convention in Cincinnati, Ohio and went on to win the Presidency over Republican John C. Frémont and Know Nothing candidate and former President Millard Fillmore.

In 1857, Packer was nominated as the Democratic Party Candidate for Governor. He was opposed by David Wilmot, author of the Wilmot Proviso which aimed to ban the expansion of slavery to territories acquired from Mexico, and Isaac Hazlehurst of the Native American Party.[3] The Panic of 1857 had crippled the nation’s economy, including the Pennsylvania iron industry. With strong support for tariffs in more normal times, the Panic increased Pennsylvania’s support for high tariffs, a stance which hurt the pro-free trade Wilmot.[3] The question of the day, however, remained the issue of slavery in Kansas. Packer forwarded a letter to his friend, President Buchanan, supporting the Kansas-Nebraska Act, but opposing an expansion of slavery in that state without a free and open process.[1] The split of the Republicans and Know Nothings made it difficult to defeat the united Democrats and Packer swept into office.[3]

In dealing with the economic crisis caused by the Panic, Packer vehemently blamed banks and the free issue of paper money over gold and silver coinage.[2] As part of a recovery plan, the Governor approved legislation to requiring state banks to limit the issue of paper currency to amounts covered by real security deposited with the state.[2]

In 1859, Packer sought to end the state’s involvement in construction and management of canals and railroads, selling off the state’s investments to the Sunbury and Erie Railroad.[2]

Governor Packer was a proponent of public schools and supported the new public school system with funds for teacher training. Packer also used his veto power to stop attacks on the new public education system by forces in the legislature.[2]

As his term came to an end, southern states had begun seceding from the union. Packer recommended that the nation’s differences be addressed in a national convention.[2] He opposed secession and, in his final address to the General Assembly, he stated, “It is therefore clear, that there is no Constitutional right of secession. Secession is only another form of nullification. Either, when attempted to be carried out by force, is rebellion, and should be treated as such, by those whose sworn duty it is to maintain the supremacy of the Constitution and laws of the United States.”[1]Packer retired from public life after the end of his term and died September 27, 1870 in Williamsport.