Packer Parkers toast the end of Prohibition, December 5th, Live Music at a 1933 Themed Party

 

What to do in and around Packer Park!! Here is a fun idea for a Wednesday night close to the neighborhood… a 1933 Themed party celebrating the end of Prohibition… see below

XFINITY Live! Philadelphia
1100 Pattison Avenue Philadelphia, PA 19148   

Start:   Wednesday, December 5, 2012  8:00 PM
End:   Wednesday, December 5, 2012  11:00 PM

Event Features: Free / No ChargeFree ParkingSpecial Event

Neighborhood: Packer Park/Sports Complex

Join Xfinity Live and the National Constitution Center on Wednesday, December 5th as they toast to the End of Prohibition at the 1933-themed Repeal Day Celebration  at XFINITY Live! Philadelphia!! Raise a glass of Batch 19 Pre-Prohibition Style Lager while enjoying live, jazz music! Come dressed in your best period attire and snap a photo with black & white models from the era! Both General Admission and VIP Tickets are available for the event. For more information and to get your tickets today, visit: http://www.xfinitylive.com/repealday

Background on the Repeal of Prohibition, December 5th 1933

In 1919, the requisite number of legislatures of the States ratified the 18th Amendment to the Federal Constitution, enabling national prohibition one year later. Many women, notably members of the Women’s Christian Temperance Union, were pivotal in bringing about national Prohibition in the United States of America, believing it would protect families, women and children from the effects of alcohol abuse.

During this period, support for Prohibition diminished among voters and politicians. John D. Rockefeller Jr., a lifelong nondrinker who had contributed much money to the Prohibitionist Anti-Saloon League, eventually announced his support for repeal because of the widespread problems he believed Prohibition had caused. Influential leaders, such as the du Pont brothers, led the Association Against the Prohibition Amendment, whose name clearly asserted its intentions.

The repeal movement also attracted a substantial portion of women, defying the assumption that recently-enfranchised female voters would automatically vote as a bloc on this issue.[8] They became pivotal in the effort to repeal, as many “had come to the painful conclusion that the destructiveness of alcohol was now embodied in Prohibition itself.”[9] By then, women had become even more politically powerful due to ratification of the Constitutional amendment for women’s suffrage. Activist Pauline Sabin argued that repeal would protect families from the corruption, violent crime, and underground drinking that resulted from Prohibition. On May 28, 1929, Sabin founded the Women’s Organization for National Prohibition Reform (WONPR), which attracted many former Prohibitionists to its ranks.[10]

Its membership was estimated at 1.5 million by the time repeal was finally passed in 1933. Originally, Sabin was among the many women who supported the 18th Amendment. Now, however, she viewed Prohibition as both hypocritical and dangerous. She recognized “the apparent decline of temperate drinking” and feared the rise of organized crime that developed around bootlegging.[11]

Additionally, she worried that America’s children, witnessing a blatant disregard for dry laws, would cease to recognize the sanctity of the law itself. Finally, Sabin and the WONPR took a libertarian stance that disapproved of federal involvement in a personal matter like drinking. Over time, however, the WONPR modified its argument, playing up the “moral wrongs that threatened the American home” as a result of the corruption of the Prohibition era.[4] As a women’sorganization during the early 20th century, adopting a political stance that centered around maternalism and home protection appealed to the widest audience and was favored over personal liberty arguments, which ultimately received little attention.

The WONPR was initially composed mainly of upper-class women. However, by the time the 21st Amendment was passed, their membership included the middle and working classes. After a short start-up period, donations from members alone were enough to financially sustain the organization. By 1931, more women belonged to the WONPR than the WCTU; by 1932, the WONPR had branches in forty-one states.[12]

The WONPR supported repeal on a platform of “true” temperance, claiming that “a trend toward moderation and restraint in the use of intoxicating beverages [was] reversed by prohibition.”[13] Though their causes were in direct opposition, the WONPR mirrored the advocacy techniques of the WCTU. They canvassed door-to-door, encouraged politicians on all levels to incorporate repeal into their party platform, created petitions, gave speeches and radio interviews, dispersed persuasive literature, and held chapter meetings. At times, the WONPR also worked in cooperation with other anti-prohibition groups. In 1932, the AAPA, Voluntary Committee of LawyersThe Crusaders, theAmerican Hotel Organization, and the WONPR formed the United Repeal Council. The United Repeal Council lobbied at both the 1932 Republican and Democratic conventions to integrate repeal into their respective presidential election campaigns. Ultimately, the Republicans continued to defend Prohibition. So the WONPR, which initially began as a nonpartisan organization, joined with the Democratic campaign and supported FDR.[14]

The number of repeal organizations and demand for repeal both increased.

The Repeal of Prohibition in the United States was accomplished with the passage of the Twenty-first Amendment to the United States Constitution on December 5, 1933.

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