Is Mayor Nutter Doing a Good Job?? Packer Parker’s respond in a recent Poll…

Are we better off now compared to 5 years ago when Mayor Nutter took office?? Has anything in Philadelphia Dramatically improved since the 3rd Quarter of 2007?

Is Philadelphia Cleaner?  Safer?  Are the schools better?

Any BIG Ideas leaping out of city hall these days?

Has the crippling underfunded City Pension system been improved upon?

Has Philadelphia’s job market dramatically changed?

Has the Mayor had the courage to take on City Council Members regarding the DROP program, the Lump Sum pension jackpot paid to city employees, which is helping bankrupt the city?

I’m not sure, are you?

We are Currently polling current Packer Park Residents for their opinion. If you would like to volunteer your opinion, go to http://www.PackerParkLiving.com and email us.

Polling results will be available shortly at http://www.PackerParkLiving.com

Packer Parkers toast the end of Prohibition, December 5th, Live Music at a 1933 Themed Party

 

What to do in and around Packer Park!! Here is a fun idea for a Wednesday night close to the neighborhood… a 1933 Themed party celebrating the end of Prohibition… see below

XFINITY Live! Philadelphia
1100 Pattison Avenue Philadelphia, PA 19148   

Start:   Wednesday, December 5, 2012  8:00 PM
End:   Wednesday, December 5, 2012  11:00 PM

Event Features: Free / No ChargeFree ParkingSpecial Event

Neighborhood: Packer Park/Sports Complex

Join Xfinity Live and the National Constitution Center on Wednesday, December 5th as they toast to the End of Prohibition at the 1933-themed Repeal Day Celebration  at XFINITY Live! Philadelphia!! Raise a glass of Batch 19 Pre-Prohibition Style Lager while enjoying live, jazz music! Come dressed in your best period attire and snap a photo with black & white models from the era! Both General Admission and VIP Tickets are available for the event. For more information and to get your tickets today, visit: http://www.xfinitylive.com/repealday

Background on the Repeal of Prohibition, December 5th 1933

In 1919, the requisite number of legislatures of the States ratified the 18th Amendment to the Federal Constitution, enabling national prohibition one year later. Many women, notably members of the Women’s Christian Temperance Union, were pivotal in bringing about national Prohibition in the United States of America, believing it would protect families, women and children from the effects of alcohol abuse.

During this period, support for Prohibition diminished among voters and politicians. John D. Rockefeller Jr., a lifelong nondrinker who had contributed much money to the Prohibitionist Anti-Saloon League, eventually announced his support for repeal because of the widespread problems he believed Prohibition had caused. Influential leaders, such as the du Pont brothers, led the Association Against the Prohibition Amendment, whose name clearly asserted its intentions.

The repeal movement also attracted a substantial portion of women, defying the assumption that recently-enfranchised female voters would automatically vote as a bloc on this issue.[8] They became pivotal in the effort to repeal, as many “had come to the painful conclusion that the destructiveness of alcohol was now embodied in Prohibition itself.”[9] By then, women had become even more politically powerful due to ratification of the Constitutional amendment for women’s suffrage. Activist Pauline Sabin argued that repeal would protect families from the corruption, violent crime, and underground drinking that resulted from Prohibition. On May 28, 1929, Sabin founded the Women’s Organization for National Prohibition Reform (WONPR), which attracted many former Prohibitionists to its ranks.[10]

Its membership was estimated at 1.5 million by the time repeal was finally passed in 1933. Originally, Sabin was among the many women who supported the 18th Amendment. Now, however, she viewed Prohibition as both hypocritical and dangerous. She recognized “the apparent decline of temperate drinking” and feared the rise of organized crime that developed around bootlegging.[11]

Additionally, she worried that America’s children, witnessing a blatant disregard for dry laws, would cease to recognize the sanctity of the law itself. Finally, Sabin and the WONPR took a libertarian stance that disapproved of federal involvement in a personal matter like drinking. Over time, however, the WONPR modified its argument, playing up the “moral wrongs that threatened the American home” as a result of the corruption of the Prohibition era.[4] As a women’sorganization during the early 20th century, adopting a political stance that centered around maternalism and home protection appealed to the widest audience and was favored over personal liberty arguments, which ultimately received little attention.

The WONPR was initially composed mainly of upper-class women. However, by the time the 21st Amendment was passed, their membership included the middle and working classes. After a short start-up period, donations from members alone were enough to financially sustain the organization. By 1931, more women belonged to the WONPR than the WCTU; by 1932, the WONPR had branches in forty-one states.[12]

The WONPR supported repeal on a platform of “true” temperance, claiming that “a trend toward moderation and restraint in the use of intoxicating beverages [was] reversed by prohibition.”[13] Though their causes were in direct opposition, the WONPR mirrored the advocacy techniques of the WCTU. They canvassed door-to-door, encouraged politicians on all levels to incorporate repeal into their party platform, created petitions, gave speeches and radio interviews, dispersed persuasive literature, and held chapter meetings. At times, the WONPR also worked in cooperation with other anti-prohibition groups. In 1932, the AAPA, Voluntary Committee of LawyersThe Crusaders, theAmerican Hotel Organization, and the WONPR formed the United Repeal Council. The United Repeal Council lobbied at both the 1932 Republican and Democratic conventions to integrate repeal into their respective presidential election campaigns. Ultimately, the Republicans continued to defend Prohibition. So the WONPR, which initially began as a nonpartisan organization, joined with the Democratic campaign and supported FDR.[14]

The number of repeal organizations and demand for repeal both increased.

The Repeal of Prohibition in the United States was accomplished with the passage of the Twenty-first Amendment to the United States Constitution on December 5, 1933.

1946 Photo of 20th & Pattison Ave. Packer Park Philadelphia

 

Amazing old time Photo of the U.S. Naval Hospital formerly located on Pattison Ave. between Broad & 20th Streets in packer Park, South Philadelphia.

The Philadelphia Naval Hospital was the first high-rise hospital building constructed by the United States Navy. At its 1935 opening it represented a state-of-the-art facility for the Navy with 650 beds and a total floor space of 352,000 square feet (32,700 m2). The dedicated medical purpose of this facility contributed to the World War II mission as the center for amputation, orthopedic and prosthetic services for Navy, Marine, and Coast Guard veterans residing east of the Rocky Mountains.

The complex was developed as a tree-lined campus of 56 buildings and structures with the main high-rise building placed at the center and augmented with amenities of a Navy Base Exchange (BX) and gas station. The central building was flanked by lower buildings in a classical Beaux-Arts arrangement. It was a striking 15-story Art Deco steel-framed tower, faced with yellow brick and brown terra cotta and described in a survey of Philadelphia architecture as “one of the finest Art Deco buildings in the city.”[citation needed] The height was a significant departure from the two- or three-story naval hospital complexes that preceded it. Detailing the building’s interior included such significant features as anodized aluminum heater gratesdepicting a ship in full sail. The grates were set in marble panels in the vestibule and below were air intakes in the shape of dolphins.

By the late 1970s declining use of the facility and studies that determined the building incapable of being renovated for modern medical use signaled the end of the hospital’s role as major medical facility for the Navy. In 1988, under the Base Realignment and Closure Act of 1988 (BRAC), the Philadelphia Naval Hospital was slated for closure and disposal. All functions were relocated from the complex in 1993, and since that date the buildings were vacant and overseen by a small security and maintenance staff. The city of Philadelphia was approved to purchase it for re-use. It was finally demolished on June 9, 2001 at 7:02 A.M.

ONLY 1 LEFT! Geary Estates, 1900-1918 Geary St., Packer Park Philadelphia

We are excited to announce that we have only one home left of the original ten, Geary Estates new construction homes in the coveted Packer Park neighborhood of South Philadelphia. These home are the 1st new construction homes in Packer Park in over 20+ years and they are one of a kind.Speak now or forever hold your peace!! These 3000sq’ beauties have it all, Roof decks, 10-year tax abatements, driveway parking, rear yards, granite kitchens with stainless steel appliances, hardwood floors n every room, finished basements and much much more- all Standard!! no upgrades needed!! Extremely High End construction at a reasonable price, $500,000 to $529,900. Visit www.PackerParkLiving.com for floor plans, specs and details.

KateDevlin2012_1916&18_Geary_JO-50

OWN a Packer Park Home for $1,227 a month… OWN !! not rent…!

We have been saying it for 3 years now…. it is THE perfect time to buy a packer Park home and it will not always be this easy!!!

The Perfect Storm for Buyers;

1. Rates are so low, you can borrow $220,000 for $988.oo/Month. Real estate taxes in packer park average $2880 annually, that’s $239/month +/-  $988 for your mortgage payment + $239/month for your taxes = $1,227 a month. you can barely rent for that amount!!!

2. Inventory is higher than ever before. Remember when we struggled to find a home in Packer Park? inventory has doubled in the area due to the construction of projects like the Reserve, Geary Estates and others…  Add the overall economic uncertainty to the equation and the 10+ months of Home Inventory available city-wide and you get a Buyers Market.

3. prices have bottomed. If you’re trying to time the Market, stop it… After several years of declining prices it is evident that prices have stabilized. Economic Indexes that track national Home prices are proof of this stabilization. Now is the time to buy.

Contact us today to buy Packer Park Real Estate !

http://www.PackerParkLiving.com

Jim Onesti, Prudential Fox & Roach Realtors, Mccann Team

50% Market Share! Packer Park Real Estate Leader Prudential Fox & Roach Realtors

Did you know that 18 out of the 36 current Packer Park and Reserve homes that are Active for sale or Pending awaiting settlement, are listed by a Prudential Fox and Roach Realtor?

18 out of 36 active and pending homes is an astonishing figure, that’s over 50%, leaving the additional 50% divided among the 25+ Other Real Estate Brokers in the South Philly/ Center City area!!!

Imagine a Law Firm with a 50% market share in a city or a Super Market. That’s one out of every two!

Prudential fox & Roach Realtors provided cutting edge technology and the most Knowledgeable and experienced agents in the business. It’s no surprise customers choose Prudential above all other choices.

*data provided by MLS as of 11/15/12*

visit: www.PRUFOXROACH.com or www.MccannTeam.com or http://www.PackerParkLiving.com

Jim Onesti, Prudential, Packer Park Real Estate